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Energy Conservation
Energy conservation
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Energy conservation is the practice of decreasing the quantity of energy used. It may be achieved through efficient energy use, in which case energy use is decreased while achieving a similar outcome, or by reduced consumption of energy services. Energy conservation may result in increase of financial capital, environmental value, national security, personal security, and human comfort. Individuals and organizations that are direct consumers of energy may want to conserve energy in order to reduce energy costs and promote economic security. Industrial and commercial users may want to increase efficiency and thus maximize profit.

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Issues with Energy Conservation
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Critics and advocates of some forms of energy conservation make the following arguments:

It may be difficult for home owners or small business to justify investment in some energy saving measures. Often the available money has higher priorities, and in many cases the time and cost investment is not worthwhile.

Condensing boilers are much more efficient than older types. Energy savings are achieved by extracting more heat, venting less heat externally. However the increased complexity results in more frequent breakdowns and much higher total servicing costs, and whether the end result is a gain is debated.

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Energy recycling
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Energy recycling is utilizing energy that would normally be wasted, usually by converting it into electricity or thermal energy. Energy recycling -- which can be undertaken at manufacturing facilities, power plants, and large institutions such as hospitals and universities -- generally increases efficiency, thereby reducing energy costs and greenhouse gas pollution simultaneously. The process is noted for its potential to mitigate global warming profitably.

Forms of energy recycling

Waste heat recovery is a process that captures excess heat that would normally be discharged at manufacturing facilities and converts it into electricity and steam. A "waste heat recovery boiler" contains a series of water-filled tubes placed throughout the area where heat is released. When high-temperature heat meets the boiler, steam is produced, which in turn powers a turbine that creates electricity. This process is similar to that of other fired boilers, but in this case, waste heat replaces a traditional flame. No fossil fuels are used in this process. Metals, glass, pulp and paper, silicon and other production plants are typical locations where waste heat recovery can be effective.

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