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Application for Greywater
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Irrigation, Indoor reuse, Extreme living conditions, Heat reclamation

Greywater typically breaks down faster than blackwater and has much less nitrogen and phosphorus. However, all greywater must be assumed to have some blackwater-type components, including pathogens of various sorts. Greywater should be applied below the soil surface where possible (e.g. in mulch filled trenches) and not sprayed, as there is a danger of inhaling the water as an aerosol.

However, long term research on greywater use on soil has not yet been done and it is possible that there may be negative impacts on soil productivity. If you are concerned about this, avoid using laundry powders; these often contain high levels of salt as a bulking agent, and this has the same effect on your soil as a drought.

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Recycling of Greywater
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Most greywaters are much easier to treat and recycle than blackwaters, due to their lower levels of contamination. However, entirely untreated greywater is still considered to be a potential health and pollution hazard, because studies have established the presence of the same micro-organisms within greywater as found in sewage (albeit in much lower concentrations). Nevertheless, while all greywater will contain micro-organisms the health hazards associated with greywater from a multiple dwelling source should be considered different from that of a single dwelling greywater source. Within single dwellings inhabitants and their clothing are mutually exposed to each other''s greywater and their shared living arrangements will likewise expose them to the existing reservoir of micro-organisms within the dwelling, whereas greywater from multiple dwelling sources provides scope for exposure to a broader reservoir of micro-organisms thus increasing the risk of disease spread between dwelling unit inhabitants.

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Greywater
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Greywater, also known as sullage, is non-industrial wastewater generated from domestic processes such as dish washing, laundry and bathing. Greywater comprises 50-80% of residential wastewater. Greywater comprises wastewater generated from all of the house's sanitation equipment exept for the toilets (water from toilets being blackwater). Greywater is distinct from blackwater in the amount and composition of its chemical and biological contaminants (from feces or toxic chemicals). Greywater gets its name from its cloudy appearance and from its status as being neither fresh (white water from groundwater or potable water), nor heavily polluted (blackwater). According to this definition wastewater fcontaining significant food residues or high concentrations of toxic chemicals from household cleaners etc. may be considered "dark grey" or blackwater.

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